AMAZON

Tuesday, July 17, 2007

An Email from Rudy Worth Sharing Without Comment












14 comments:

  1. That's quite a bit to think about. It reminds me of the line from the Eucharistic prayer: "We look to the day when sharing by all will mean scarcity for none."

    Come, Lord Jesus.

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  2. Imagine all the people, shareing all the world...

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  3. Today, one in three Africans are malnourished, and about half of it’s nearly 700 million people live on less than $1 a day; most (80 percent) live on less than $2 a day.

    • Income growth in Africa barely has kept pace with population growth, remaining below the 2.5 percent and causing Africa’s share of the world’s absolute poor to increase from one-fourth to nearly a third.

    • Africa is a diverse continent that contains nearly a fourth of the lands total land area. Despite its immense size, only 430 million areas – less than one-fifth of the entire United States – are considered suitable for farming. Land degradation is a major threat to Africa’s agricultural productivity growth.

    • Any effort to develop agriculture and improve household food security must include a focus on women. Most African farmers are women, and female headed households are more prone to hunger and poverty. African women generate two-thirds of Africa’s agricultural production, and participate in trade and processing.

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  4. I too shall comment anonymously.

    I know your heart is in the right place.

    But I find these photos sensationalise the plight of the poor in Africa without any real education of what to do for their benefit. All we are being led to do here is feel self satisfied that we aren't them.

    Images of starving children for the sake of emotional response never sits well with me. The poor are not instrumental to our feeling good about ourselves.

    I know you have a good heart and didn't intend to sensationalise but I found this poorly considered.

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  5. Ah...and the kicker is that these kids would probably be MAKING the Nikes and Adidas in the first place.

    But, hey, its a living - especially on a continent where child-headed households will possibly soon outnumber female headed households in the face of the AIDS epidemic - and where these kids don't have the same property rights as adults.

    I'd like to see the poor earn a better living wage and have medicines that our pharamaceuticals companies could provide if Northern shareholders weren't so keen to make their 401Ks grow as share prices rise.

    So...if buying Nikes will put a shilling or two on the table of some poor worker in Africa...I'm all for keeping the economy flowing - and for really working for FAIR trade.

    Its not a question of not consuming - its a question of wise choices and exercising our power as consumers to demand ethical and fair trade, to reduce transport costs and our carbon footprint by buying local and by really demanding that corporations build capacity where they locate.

    Ok...enough from my pink soapbox.
    xx
    pinks

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  6. That’s some potent consciousness raising for us First Worlders, especially the kids of the “I Gotta Have” generation.

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  7. Gratitude goes a long way. It's devistating to see people in this state of living. Even if we give just a little, we can be helping out so much... the cost for them to survive is minimal, yet we sometimes forget that just a little gives a lot.

    God bless you Nick, for sending such important messages!

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  8. Wow, that really puts things in perspective. Thank you.

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  9. I am embarrassed to say that I am not nearly as thankful for my blessings as I should be. This is a very good reminder. As Thomas said, imagine all the people, sharing all the world...

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  10. I have had that one, too, Nick. Makes us think, doesn't it?

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